Primary sources are first hand facts.
   National Archives
Microfilm Publication

Primary Source Place (PSP) records are authentic. They are published by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) which keeps the United States records.  With more microfilm rolls to come from North Carolina and eventually 10 other states plus District of Columbia, At this point, roll 1, July 1865-July 1867 has been digitized and put on Primary Source Place's website.

 

This roll is the reproduced records of the Assistant Commissioner  for North Carolina, Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands which was established in the War Department by an act on March 3, 1865 shortly after the American  Civil War ended in April 1865.

These records  are front row view of what seem to be living documents from every day lives of Americans that lived through the aftermath of the American Civil War. This early Reconstruction period, will enable researchers from scholars to genealogists find fine details written in these records which gives first hand accounts of what life was like transitioning from a time of enslavement to a time of what was to be freedom of thousands  and how North Carolinians and others responded to this new way of life.

 

PSP understands that quality researching  involves a great deal of time. Headings were given to the most twelve reoccurring situations, and there are hundreds of  records categorized which will support, add to or perhaps subtract from your historical projects to develop a more comprehensive understanding of this time period in American History.

 

 

   Accessible
Convenient

Billions of valuable records are kept at NARA. Primary Sources Place has a special feature that gives you needed information which will help you. We perform our OWN extractions, digitization, and categorization of  requested records. 

 

This attribute gives PSP deep knowledge of the documents whereby we may be able to quickly respond to any inquires to assist in  your historical explorations. 

 

It is PSP's priority to make these state records more accessible and convenient to everyone on every level. With much effort placed on accuracy the records are placed under 12 major headings.  Each heading represents one major theme on roll 1 of the reproduced records of the Assistant Commissioner  for North Carolina, Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands. As you browse by name or by heading the hundreds of categorized documents are available for you to download.

 These transcribed, organized, and categorized documents have thousands  of full names, dates and locations as well as  stories of American experiences from all walks of life during this challenging time in American history.  

 

  
ROOTS
OF PASSION

"Here you are before I ever was,"   is what I said to myself  the first time I saw my ancestors names listed in a big and heavy red 19th century census book in the archives room in Raleigh, North Carolina in the mid 1980s.

 

Before then, I had been hearing  varied family stories, and in the 1970s in high school, I enrolled in my first history class that began to tell the factual story of descendants of the  continent of Africa in America. Hence, I have been passionately rooted in finding and sharing not my story but millions of his story 19th century American life and experience that tell a more accurate American history.

Through decades of researching,  I have found the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandon Land records to be real life experiences, unknown and surprising events, and rich in true information and unknown stories to be told of people whom many men, women, and children would be lost but have been recorded in these records. Like, what is the story of the parentless enslaved children in North Carolina in April 1865 when the Civil War ended? 

PSP makes accessible and convenient authentic documents to connect the past to today's present, and to tomorrows future, from generation to generation. 

Primary sources are first hand facts.
   National Archives
Microfilm Publication
   Accessible
Convenient

Billions of valuable records are kept at NARA. Primary Sources Place has a special feature that gives you needed information which will help you. We perform our OWN extractions, digitization, and categorization of  requested records. 

This attribute gives PSP deep knowledge of the documents whereby we may be able to quickly respond to any inquires to assist in  your historical explorations. 

 

It is PSP's priority to make these state records more accessible and convenient to everyone on every level. With much effort placed on accuracy the records are placed under 12 major headings.  Each heading represents one major theme on roll 1 of the reproduced records of the Assistant Commissioner  for North Carolina, Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands. As you browse by name or by heading the hundreds of categorized documents are available for you to download.

 These transcribed, organized, and categorized documents have thousands  of full names, dates and locations as well as  stories of American experiences from all walks of life during this challenging time in American history.  

 

  
ROOTS OF PASSION

"Here you are before I ever was,"   is what I said to myself  the first time I saw my ancestors names listed in a big and heavy red 19th century census book in the archives room in Raleigh, North Carolina in the mid 1980s.

 

Before then, I had been hearing  varied family stories, and in the 1970s in high school, I enrolled in my first history class that began to tell the factual story of descendants of the  continent of Africa in America. Hence, I have been passionately rooted in finding and sharing not my story but millions of his story 19th century American life and experience that tell a more accurate American history.

Through decades of researching,  I have found the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandon Land records to be real life experiences, unknown and surprising events, and rich in true information and unknown stories to be told of people whom many men, women, and children would be lost but have been recorded in these records. Like, what is the story of the parentless enslaved children in North Carolina in April 1865 when the Civil War ended? 

PSP makes accessible and convenient authentic documents to connect the past to today's present, and to tomorrows future, from generation to generation. 

Uninterpreted, original accounts take you back in time and you feel the atmosphere of the era.

   National Archives

Microfilm Publication

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 The primary sources on this  website come from America's record keeper the National Archives in Washington, D.C.  These  unhidden sources have been placed on microfilm, and they show and tell of a crucial part of the history of the United States. These what seemed to be the neglected, the unknown, and the overlooked reproduced records come by the way State Archives in Raleigh, North Carolina.  At this point this is just a snippet of the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands original records of letters and telegrams with topics that range from civil rights, to ration recommendations, to property disputes, to military orders, and to circulars and much more.

In readings records from the War Department, they bring to life the good and the bad struggles, the frustrations and the determinations during a time of  chaos. attempting to transition a part of the country from  entrenched enslavement to equality for all. 

         Accessible

        Convenient

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We recognize that everyone  purposes for researching are not the same,  and that everyone does not have the same researching  skills. Regardless of what the skill levels or purposes, everyone's research is important to Primary Source Place. Therefore, we have these sources easily and simply accessible to all. Passwords and logins are not necessary. Raw data is chronologized by prevalent topics gained from careful reading of the primary  documents.

 

At Primary Sources Place, there are no membership fees and you are invited to access these captivating documents which transcend you back in time at your leisure. You do not have to be located at a national facility or state archives  computer to gain access to these poignant and thrilling American historical experiences from some of the most prominent Americans to the ordinary Americans of the time.

          ROOTS

       OF PASSION

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"Here I am before I ever was,"   is what I said to myself  the first time I saw my ancestors names listed in a big and heavy red 19th century census book in the archives room in Raleigh, North Carolina in the mid 1980s.

​Before then, I had been hearing  varied stories of my ancestors, and in the 1970s in high school, I enrolled in my first class in history that began to tell the factual "his story" of Americans who  were largely but not entirely descendants of the people  of the  continent of Africa. Hence, I have been passionately searching  sharing not my story only,  but many  18th and 19th century American  experiences that tell a more accurate and truthful American "his...story."

 Through decades of researching,  I have found the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandon Land records to be real human life experiences. These shocking, disturbing, and surprising events are rich in true information. The unknown stories of many men, women, and children would be lost if the information had not been recorded in these records. Like, the stories of the orphaned enslaved children in North Carolina in April 1865 when the Civil War ended.

​PSP makes accessible and convenient authentic documents to connect the past to today's present race relations, policy making, and nation building to tomorrows future, from generation to generation. 

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